Teaching Talks & Hands-On HuskyCT

Teaching Talks

You are invited to participate in a series of informal teaching talks.  These are opportunities for participants to comfortably share teaching concerns and discuss techniques and strategies with colleagues, experts, and CETL staff.  All sessions will take place in Rowe 319 unless otherwise noted.  All UConn instructors —graduate students, TAs, and APIRs, as well as adjunct, tenure-track and tenured faculty—are encouraged to attend.

Attend all the sessions or choose only those covering the topics that most interest you. 

Contact Suzanne LaFleur if you have questions or would like more information.

Link to HBL CLC Map – https://lib.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/FloorMap_Level2.pdf

Collaborative Learning Classroom is on the 2nd Floor of the Homer Babbidge Library. Once off the stairs or elevator take a left, take another left once through doors.

     

    JANUARY

     

    Reaching Underprepared Students
    Wednesday, January 22          2:00-3:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will leave with specific strategies for identifying underprepared students, specifically areas in which they are underprepared, as well as strategies for bringing the students up to speed.

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Turn it around: Consider how an unprepared or underprepared student feels
    • Assessing how prepared students are (quick, ungraded pretest, short writing assignment, small group then whole group discussion…)
    • Determining what needs to be done to bring them “up to speed”
    • Your responsibility, theirs, some of each?
    • The role of feedback. Types of feedback. The importance of feedback- read and comment upon rough drafts, have checkpoints for projects and actually check them
    • Freshmen in particular
    • On campus sources- the Writing Center, tutoring services, Q center, achieve.uconn.edu, the library…
    • Working in small groups, peer editing, peer feedback in general…
    • Study groups for test prep; groups that meet regularly throughout the semester
    • Consider giving work done early in the semester less value in grading: 1st test- 20%, 2nd test 30%, Final 40%, quizzes, HW, class participation 10%- something like that

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1155

     

     

    Crafting Discussion and Dialogue Questions
    Friday, January 24       11:00-12:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1123

     

     

    Active Listening
    Friday, January 24       1:00-2:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    This teaching talk will begin by sharing when and why you seek to use active listening skills or nurture them in your students. We will then try some active listening simulation exercises. We will also discuss listening assignments and the assessment of active listening.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1124

     

     

    Designing activities to foster critical thinking
    Tuesday, January 28   11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    How do you incorporate critical thinking into your course design? How do you build it into class time when class time already seems too short to cover all the content you want to cover? What are some critical literacy activities you have implemented in your classes? How did you think about assessment of them? In this teaching talk we will share experiences, challenges, and activities that can be modified to fit even a small amount of class time.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1130

     

     

    A conversation about inclusive teaching practices
    Tuesday, January 28   2:00-3:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    In this teaching talk we will discuss topics such as:
    • Welcoming all students and promoting belongingness
    • The relevance of diversity
    • Kinds of inclusion
    • Becoming aware of and examining our own assumptions and bias
    • The importance of dialogue and guidelines for dialogue

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1131

     

     

     

    Using Play and Games in Teaching
    Thursday, January 30  11:00-12:15
    OAK 110
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    Come share how you use play and games in your teaching. How can fostering an attitude of play support cognitive, social, and emotional learning? What are your concerns about playful approaches to course materials? Possible topics for discussion: gamification, improvisational games, icebreakers.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1125

     

     

    Contemplative Practices Reading Group
    Thursday, January 30  1:00-2:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    This reading group is for instructors who are interested in how contemplative practices can improve teaching and learning. The first book to be discussed is Rhonda Magee’s The Inner Work of Racial Justice. Advance registration is required. CETL has purchased a limited number of books for participants. Refreshments will be provided.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1126

     

     

    Time Management within a Single Class
    Thursday, January 30              3:00-4:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Wayne, Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will leave with specific time management strategies

    We will discuss such topics as:

    • Have a plan going in
    • Understand that nearly everything will take either more or less time than you expected it to. Adjust accordingly.
    • Do frequent time checks during class-
    • If there’s no clock in the room consult your watch or phone regularly
    • Start with your objectives- Prioritize the list
    • Active learning (discussion, mini-projects, projects, problems…) takes time.
    • Start on time. End on time.
    • Have a plan for what was not covered
    • At the end of class a brief wrap up or “exit slip” enhances learning.
    • Think about what you need to do after the class ends

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1156

     

    FEBRUARY

    Successful Teaching and Learning as an Introvert or a Shy Person
    Monday, February 3               3:15-4:30
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will walk away with specific strategies for being successful as a teacher or a student, and alternative strategies for taking “center stage” less often.

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Situations and learning environments where introverts thrive
    • Inclusive teaching strategies
    • Communication strategies
    • Distinguishing between introversion and lack of confidence
    • Developing a positive view of your temperament & personality

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1157

     

     

    Managing Anxiety, Yours and Theirs
    Tuesday, February 11             11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will come away with specific strategies for managing their own and their students’ anxieties

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Causes of anxiety: Lack of confidence, Lack of knowledge, lack of preparation, lack of experience, the unknown…

    Solutions:

    • Prioritize tasks (It’s not ALL vital or ALL immediate)
    • work with a partner or friend, seek help from a colleague, a friend, a professional,
    • establish and follow routines,
    • move (exercise), get enough rest,
    • consider how to change the environment to make it more effective for you, breathe,
    • think positive thoughts and believe in yourself, consider accommodations, laugh- esp. when you want to cry (crying is okay, too)
    • Managing Student Anxiety:
    • Give choices
    • Be Flexible
    • Listen
    • Share all relevant information regarding grades, assignments, policies…
    • Make a connection with your students

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1158

     

    Crafting discussion and dialogue questions
    Thursday, February 13                        1:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1172

     

     

    Embracing Diversity in the College Classroom
    Wednesday, February 19                    1:30-2:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    If we truly believe that our mission as educators involves providing all students with equal opportunities to learn, we have to be ready to do just that. In this session, we will address:

    • the notion of cultural competence and cultural competency in the classroom
    • how to welcome and incorporate diversity into all our classes, even if our topic/discipline doesn’t seem to obviously lend to that
    • ideas for helping ourselves and our students and be more culturally competent

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1159

     

    Less Listening, More Active Participation
    Tuesday, February 25             2:00-3:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will come away with specific strategies for getting students more actively involved in their learning.

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like:

    • When do I need to lecture, and when may I allow students to learn on their own?
    • Overcoming obstacles to active learning
    • Opening the lecture to increase active learning
    • Strategies to activate the classroom
    • Small group discussion, whole group discussion
    • Active learning through projects, problem solving activities, experiments …
    • Giving choices
    • Specific things to consider for the beginner

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1160

     

    MARCH

    Climate in the College Classroom
    Monday, March 2                   3:15-4:30
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne, Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will walk away with:

    Specific, concrete strategies for creating and maintaining a positive learning environment, beginning before the first day of class and continuing through the entire semester.

    We will discuss things like:

    • What to do before the first day of class
    • How to begin the first class
    • Things to do every day…

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1161

     

     

    Using Test Blueprints to Guide Instructional Activities
    Monday, March 9                   12:30-1:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Martina Rosenberg, CETL

    Tired of being asked “what will be on the test?”, unsure which questions to include from a question bank for the next exam?  Creating a test blueprint helps you to articulate the knowledge and skills you want to assess in your class and will enable you to build purpose-driven, successful assessments. A blueprint may also help you identify areas where your question pool may be lacking and can serve to document how you teach.

    Register at –  https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1197

     

     

    Effective Use of Small Group Instruction
    Tuesday, March 10                 1:15-2:30
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will walk away with specific strategies for using small group instruction in classes of any size

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Why small groups
    • What types of learning goals are suited to small group work?
    • Techniques for set up, implementation…
    • Five specific considerations… 

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1162

     

     

    Feedback and Assessment
    Wednesday, March 18                        11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will walk away with specific strategies for giving specific, useful feedback. How to fairly assess student work…

    At this session, participants will discuss topics such as:

    • Formative and summative assessment
    • Criterion referenced (individual performance) vs. Proportionate grading (curve)
    • Simple everyday formative assessment strategies
    • Fairness in assessment
    • Alternatives to exams, tests, and quizzes
    • Classroom participation, homework, extra credit, the “fudge factor”
    • Exit slips to help you to evaluate your effectiveness
    • The final grade

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1163

     

    Crafting discussion and dialogue questions
    Thursday, March 26                11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL 

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1173

     

    Teaching Creatively
    Thursday, March 26                1:30-2:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL 

    Participants will leave with specific strategies for teaching more creatively

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like:

    • Tools to enhance creativity, such as SCAMPER, Synectics, Brainstorming, and others
    • The role of choice in motivating students to be more creative and productive
    • Presenting products creatively
    • Taking chances
    • Active learning
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • Playing to your strengths
    • Finding creative ways to present material in order to increase student interest and participation
    • The role of improvisation, role play, story telling, modeling the real world…
    • Learning games, Ice Breakers…
    • Making it safe to fail
    • Using art and music
    • Divergent and convergent thinking
    • Using student creativity to help plan more interesting lessons
    • Encouraging reluctant students to be more creative
    • Assessment techniques that encourage creative problem solving

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1164

     

     

    Public Speaking and Presentation Tips
    Monday, March 30                 3:15-4:30
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will come away with specific strategies for giving more effective presentations, in the classroom, at a workshop or other presentation, speaking one on one with a student, mentee, colleague…

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • A presentation is a presentation. There are many similarities between teaching a class and public speaking
    • Interrupt the lecture- small group discussion, large group discussion, questions- yours and theirs… Involve the class/audience as much and as often as possible
    • Effective use of PowerPoint slides- What to show, what not to show, how to use the slides
    • Speak the students’, or audience’s language, and making the presentation fit the audience
    • Move away from the board or the podium; get as close to the audience as possible
    • Effective use of humor
    • Dealing with our stress
    • Tell your stories when they are relevant
    • Make it relevant

    Register at –

    https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1165

     

    APRIL

    Crafting discussion and dialogue questions
    Thursday, April 2                     1:00-2:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL 

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1174

     

    Interpreting and using student ratings data (SET)
    Tuesday, April 21        3:30-4:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Martina Rosenberg, CETL 

    Whether you find it stressful to read your own SETs, want to use SETs as feedback tool  or are an department administrator that needs to make sense of them. Come and join for an exploration around what Student  ‘evaluations’ of teaching  can and cannot  tell us about the student experience in the classroom.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1198

     

     

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    HANDS-ON HUSKYCT Workshops and other EdTech Workshops

     

    JANUARY

    Using iClickers
    Monday 1/27, 1:00-2:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Cloud and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Cloud and iClicker Classic versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1202

     

    Design an Accessible Syllabus
    1/28 Tuesday 9:00-10:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL

    Design an Accessible Syllabus

    Creating accessible documents is easy, requires little additional effort, and benefits students and instructors in various ways.  In this workshop, you’ll learn about the importance behind making an accessible syllabus and using Microsoft Word you’ll create an accessible syllabus for your class.  Please bring a laptop and a copy of your syllabus, if you have one.

    Better Student Comprehension

    Well-structured documents make information easier to consume by students of all abilities. Using a well-defined heading structure allows a reader to zero in on important information quickly. 

    Faster Document Revisions

    Well-structured documents allow an editor to use the Navigation Pane to quickly find sections in need of updating, like due dates or grading schedules. The styles panel also allows you to easily change the look of your document. If a document has a strong heading structure, an author can generate a table of contents programmatically. 

    Less Rushing

    Students come to campus to participate in higher education with a wide range of abilities and accommodation letters are an increasingly common occurrence. A syllabus created with accessibility in mind reduces (or eliminates) the work required to accommodate all students for this document.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1203

     

     

    Using iClickers
    Thursday 1/30, 9:00-10:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Cloud and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Cloud and iClicker Classic versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1204

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Thursday, 1/30, 10:30-12:00
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1201

     

     

    Basics of e-portfolios to advance learning
    Thursday, 1/30, 1:00-2:30
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    An e-portfolio is an intentionally designed instructional approach that encourages periodic reflection on and deepening of learning by connecting and making sense of experiences inside and outside of the classroom. This session will discuss e-portfolios in general and briefly demonstrate the Portfolium software as a means to deepen learning and increase connections between academic, co-curricular, and extra-curricular experiences. Along with basics of Portfolium, this session will also introduce faculty to creating and scoring assignments and linking with HuskyCT, along with basics on program level assessment.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1181

     

    FEBRUARY

    DIY Closed Captioning & Creating Accessible Digital Content
    Tuesday, 2/4, 10:00-11:00
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    We will discuss best practice when captioning and will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy.  Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content.

    Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students. In addition, we’ll explore tools that you can use to make your documents accessible such as tagging images, using styles in Microsoft Word, etc.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1205

     

     

    Basics of Digital Badging
    Thursday, 2/6, 12:30-2:00
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    In a rapidly changing society, digital badges are credentials awarded to individuals that publicly certify achievement or competence. Badges provide an indicator of accomplishment, skill, or interest in a learning environment. This session provides a basic understanding of the role of digital badging.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1184

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Friday, 2/7, 10:30-12:00
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1207

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Monday, 2/17, 1:00-2:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1208

     

     

    Basics of e-portfolios to advance learning
    Thursday, 2/20, 11:30-1:00
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    An e-portfolio is an intentionally designed instructional approach that encourages periodic reflection on and deepening of learning by connecting and making sense of experiences inside and outside of the classroom. This session will discuss e-portfolios in general and briefly demonstrate the Portfolium software as a means to deepen learning and increase connections between academic, co-curricular, and extra-curricular experiences. Along with basics of Portfolium, this session will also introduce faculty to creating and scoring assignments and linking with HuskyCT, along with basics on program level assessment.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1182

     

    DIY Closed Captioning & Creating Accessible Digital Content
    Thursday, 2/27, 10:30-11:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    We will discuss best practice when captioning and will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy.  Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content.

    Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students. In addition, we’ll explore tools that you can use to make your documents accessible such as tagging images, using styles in Microsoft Word, etc.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1209

     

    MARCH

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Tuesday, 3/3, 10:00-11:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1210

     

     

    Basics of Digital Badging
    Thursday, 3/5, 10:00-11:30
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    In a rapidly changing society, digital badges are credentials awarded to individuals that publicly certify achievement or competence. Badges provide an indicator of accomplishment, skill, or interest in a learning environment. This session provides a basic understanding of the role of digital badging.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1185

     

     

    Virtual Meetings: WebEx vs. Blackboard Collaborate
    3/5 Thursday 2:30-3:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL

    Online only using WebEx (https://uconn-cmr.webex.com/join/kps05003) and Blackboard Collaborate Ultra (https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/d986329edfef42769b391c50935cdc6e)

    This workshop will increase your knowledge about and comfort level using either WebEx or Blackboard Ultra Collaborate as a communication and collaboration tool. You’ll learn how to use either of these products for small groups and online (virtual) office hours as well as which to use for your needs (office hours, guest lecturers, share screens in meetings, etc.).

    We will begin the workshop by going to my WebEx Personal Room at: https://uconn-cmr.webex.com/join/kps05003

    Then the second half of the training will be in Blackboard Collaborate at: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/d986329edfef42769b391c50935cdc6e

    Before the Session Begins Please:

    1. Test if you can run WebEx on your computer and browser by going to: https://www.webex.com/test-meeting.html
    2. Test if you can run Blackboard Collaborate Ultra on your computer and browser (Chrome recommended) by going to: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/d986329edfef42769b391c50935cdc6e (the room will be empty but you’ll be able to turn on your audio and video by clicking the microphone and camera icons shown at the bottom of the screen).

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1211

     

     

    Basics of e-portfolios to advance learning
    Wednesday, 3/11, 9:00-10:30
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    An e-portfolio is an intentionally designed instructional approach that encourages periodic reflection on and deepening of learning by connecting and making sense of experiences inside and outside of the classroom. This session will discuss e-portfolios in general and briefly demonstrate the Portfolium software as a means to deepen learning and increase connections between academic, co-curricular, and extra-curricular experiences. Along with basics of Portfolium, this session will also introduce faculty to creating and scoring assignments and linking with HuskyCT, along with basics on program level assessment.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1183

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Wednesday, 3/18, 1:00-2:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1212

     

     

    DIY Closed Captioning & Creating Accessible Digital Content
    Friday, 3/20, 9:30-10:30
    ROWE 319 & Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek, CETL 

    We will discuss best practice when captioning and will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy.  Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content.

    Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students. In addition, we’ll explore tools that you can use to make your documents accessible such as tagging images, using styles in Microsoft Word, etc.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1213

     

     

    APRIL

    Basics of Digital Badging
    Thursday, 4/2, 1:00-2:30
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    In a rapidly changing society, digital badges are credentials awarded to individuals that publicly certify achievement or competence. Badges provide an indicator of accomplishment, skill, or interest in a learning environment. This session provides a basic understanding of the role of digital badging.

    Register at – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1186

     

     

     

    Contact edtech@uconn.edu if you have questions or would like more information.