Teaching Talks & Hands-On HuskyCT

Teaching Talks

You are invited to participate in a series of informal teaching talks.  These are opportunities for participants to comfortably share teaching concerns and discuss techniques and strategies with colleagues, experts, and CETL staff.  All sessions will take place in Rowe 319 unless otherwise noted.  All UConn instructors —graduate students, TAs, and APIRs, as well as adjunct, tenure-track and tenured faculty—are encouraged to attend.

Attend all the sessions or choose only those covering the topics that most interest you. 

Contact Suzanne LaFleur if you have questions or would like more information.

Link to HBL CLC Map – https://lib.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/FloorMap_Level2.pdf

Collaborative Learning Classroom is on the 2nd Floor of the Homer Babbidge Library. Once off the stairs or elevator take a left, take another left once through doors.

     

    DECEMBER

    Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere
    Tuesday, December 3             11:00-12:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will walk away from the talk with:

      • Specific tools and strategies related to creating and maintaining a positive classroom atmosphere
      • We will discuss topics such as:
      • Maintaining a positive attitude
      • Providing clear expectations, clear boundaries…
      • Getting to know your students and making a connection
      • Making students feel heard, welcome, and showing you care
      • Maximizing Opportunities for active learning…

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1090

     

    Crafting Discussion and Dialogue Questions
    Thursday, December 5            11:00-12:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1119

     

     

    Leading Effective Discussions
    Thursday, December 5            1:00-2:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will come away with specific strategies for leading effective discussions.

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like

    • Why Discussions?
    • Collaborative environment
    • Don’t dominate the discussion
    • How to maximize student participation
    • Wait time
    • Small group to large group
    • Reluctant speakers
    • Questions that lead to good discussions
    • Questions that do NOT lead to good discussions
    • Respectful disagreement
    • iClickers, Poll Everywhere…
    • Using student questions as a springboard to effective discussions

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1091

     

     

    Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
    Monday, December 9             3:15-4:30
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will come away with specific strategies for giving more effective presentations, in the classroom, at a workshop or other presentation, speaking one on one with a student, mentee, colleague…

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • A presentation is a presentation. There are many similarities between teaching a class and public speaking
    • Interrupt the lecture- small group discussion, large group discussion, questions- yours and theirs… Involve the class/audience as much and as often as possible
    • Effective use of PowerPoint slides- What to show, what not to show, how to use the slides
    • Speak the students’, or audience’s language, and making the presentation fit the audience
    • Move away from the board or the podium; get as close to the audience as possible
    • Effective use of humor
    • Dealing with our stress
    • Tell your stories when they are relevant
    • Make it relevant

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1092

     

     

    Equitable participation in class
    Wednesday, December 11     12:30-1:45
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL 

    Possible areas for this conversational exchange: What modalities do you use to encourage student participation in discussions and group projects? How do you assess participation? How do you motivate students to participate? How do you equalize opportunities for non-native speakers, introverted students, and others who tend to participate less? What are some pitfalls to avoid?

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1120

     

     

    Designing for engagement
    Wednesday, December 11     2:00-3:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Student engagement is more important than course content.

    What role does engagement play in your teaching? How can you recognize a student’s level of engagement? How do you work within each student’s level of engagement with course material? When is it appropriate, desirable, and effective to design instruction to fit a student’s level of engagement? How do assessment (grading) and other kinds of feedback factor into engagement?

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1121

     

     

    First Impressions and the First Day of Class
    Thursday, December 12          2:00-3:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Wayne Trembly, CETL

    Participants will walk away with:

    • Specific strategies for making a good first impression as well as specific strategies for conducting the first class in a manner that will draw students in and, hopefully, be motivated to do well in the class.
    • We will discuss topics such as:
    • Preparing for the first class
    • How to begin- the very beginning
    • What to include, how to go about it
    • Introductions, yours and theirs…

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1093

     

     

    Using Play and Games in Teaching
    Wednesday, January 8            1:00-2:15
    Rowe 132
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    Come share how you use play and games in your teaching. How can fostering an attitude of play support cognitive, social, and emotional learning? What are your concerns about playful approaches to course materials? Possible topics for discussion: gamification, improvisational games, icebreakers.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1122

     

     

    Crafting a teaching Philosophy statement
    Thursday, January 9    11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    At this session, participants will discuss the concept of the teaching philosophy—its attributes, value, and uses—as they begin to envision writing a teaching philosophy of their own. To prepare for this session, participants are encouraged to reflect on their own teaching by trying one of these brainstorming exercises (optional):
    • Draft a letter to someone outside academia on the joys and challenges of teaching
    • List the qualities of an effective teacher
    • Free write about a memorable experience in the classroom or in the field
    • Outline a dream course

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1127

     

     

    Designing a syllabus
    Monday, January 13   9:30-10:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    At this session, participants will discuss issues like

    • Course-design concerns
    • Syllabus requirements
    • Policy statements (what to include and why)
    • How students use a syllabus
    • Using the syllabus to engage students

    If possible, bring a draft syllabus to work on during this session.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1128

     

     

    Crafting a teaching philosophy statement
    Monday, January 13   2:30-2:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    At this session, participants will discuss the concept of the teaching philosophy—its attributes, value, and uses—as they begin to envision writing a teaching philosophy of their own. To prepare for this session, participants are encouraged to reflect on their own teaching by trying one of these brainstorming exercises (optional):
    • Draft a letter to someone outside academia on the joys and challenges of teaching
    • List the qualities of an effective teacher
    • Free write about a memorable experience in the classroom or in the field
    • Outline a dream course

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1129

     

    Icebreakers you can use in the classrooms, large and small
    Tuesday, January 14
    ROWE 131       9:30-10:45
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL 

    Building on theater games, this workshop will introduce you to different ways to enhance student engagement with other students in the classroom through icebreakers. Some icebreakers are designed as on-the-spot, low-stakes games that don’t take a lot of time, while others are designed to support community building in more depth, over time. We will discuss how community and relationship building impacts learning.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1137

     

     

    Podcast and audio assignments
    Tuesday, January 14   11:30-12:45
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    Students who are reticent to speak in whole-class discussions may display remarkable eloquence and engagement through other kinds of assignments requiring oral communication. In this teaching talk we will explore how assigning students to compose podcasts or other kinds of audio-recordings can:

    • encourage creativity, participation, and listening;
      • help scaffold the development of discussion skills; and
      • increase engagement with course material.

    We think of podcasts as a series of conversations or reflections on a particular topic or theme. The genre includes a range of approaches. But generally they are informal in tone and don’t necessarily require high production values. The term “podcast” might describe a one-off audio assignment, or a series of them.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1136

     

    Crafting Discussion and Dialogue Questions
    Friday, January 24       11:00-12:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    For instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small. We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1123

     

     

    Active Listening
    Friday, January 24       1:00-2:15
    Rowe 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    This teaching talk will begin by sharing when and why you seek to use active listening skills or nurture them in your students. We will then try some active listening simulation exercises. We will also discuss listening assignments and the assessment of active listening.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1124

     

     

    Designing activities to foster critical thinking
    Tuesday, January 28   11:00-12:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    How do you incorporate critical thinking into your course design? How do you build it into class time when class time already seems too short to cover all the content you want to cover? What are some critical literacy activities you have implemented in your classes? How did you think about assessment of them? In this teaching talk we will share experiences, challenges, and activities that can be modified to fit even a small amount of class time.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1130

     

     

    A conversation about inclusive teaching practices
    Tuesday, January 28   2:00-3:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    In this teaching talk we will discuss topics such as:
    • Welcoming all students and promoting belongingness
    • The relevance of diversity
    • Kinds of inclusion
    • Becoming aware of and examining our own assumptions and bias
    • The importance of dialogue and guidelines for dialogue

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1131

     

    Using Play and Games in Teaching
    Thursday, January 30  11:00-12:15
    OAK 110
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    Come share how you use play and games in your teaching. How can fostering an attitude of play support cognitive, social, and emotional learning? What are your concerns about playful approaches to course materials? Possible topics for discussion: gamification, improvisational games, icebreakers.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1125

     

     

    Contemplative Practices Reading Group
    Thursday, January 30  1:00-2:15
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Tina Huey, CETL

    This reading group is for instructors who are interested in how contemplative practices can improve teaching and learning. The first book to be discussed is Rhonda Magee’s The Inner Work of Racial Justice. Advance registration is required. CETL has purchased a limited number of books for participants. Refreshments will be provided.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1126

     

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    HANDS-ON HUSKYCT Workshops and other EdTech Workshops

     

    DECEMBER

    Preparing your Grade Center for Grade Calculation and Final Grade Submission
    Tuesday, 12/3, 10:30am-12:00 pm
    Online
    Presenter: Daniel Facchinetti

    In this session, you will learn to ensure your Grade Center is set up to accurately record and calculate student grades within HuskyCT. We will cover specific settings and features including total points calculations, weighted percentage calculations, categorizing graded items, including/excluding graded items, incorporating tests/exams, assignments, discussions, as well as many other types of assessments and grades in your course. We will also cover how to send a grade column to Student Admin for midterm and final grade submission.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1102

     

     

     

    Preparing your Grade Center for Grade Calculation and Final Grade Submission
    Wednesday, 12/4, 2:30-4:00
    Online
    Presenter: Daniel Facchinetti

     In this session, you will learn to ensure your Grade Center is set up to accurately record and calculate student grades within HuskyCT. We will cover specific settings and features including total points calculations, weighted percentage calculations, categorizing graded items, including/excluding graded items, incorporating tests/exams, assignments, discussions, as well as many other types of assessments and grades in your course. We will also cover how to send a grade column to Student Admin for midterm and final grade submission.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1103

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Monday, 12/9, 1:00-2:30
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1109

     

     

    Preparing your Grade Center for Grade Calculation and Final Grade Submission
    Tuesday, 12/10, 2:30-4:00
    Online
    Presenter: Daniel Facchinetti

    In this session, you will learn to ensure your Grade Center is set up to accurately record and calculate student grades within HuskyCT. We will cover specific settings and features including total points calculations, weighted percentage calculations, categorizing graded items, including/excluding graded items, incorporating tests/exams, assignments, discussions, as well as many other types of assessments and grades in your course. We will also cover how to send a grade column to Student Admin for midterm and final grade submission.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1104

     

      

    Preparing your Grade Center for Grade Calculation and Final Grade Submission
    Wednesday, 12/11, 9:30-11:00
    Online
    Presenter: Daniel Facchinetti

    In this session, you will learn to ensure your Grade Center is set up to accurately record and calculate student grades within HuskyCT. We will cover specific settings and features including total points calculations, weighted percentage calculations, categorizing graded items, including/excluding graded items, incorporating tests/exams, assignments, discussions, as well as many other types of assessments and grades in your course. We will also cover how to send a grade column to Student Admin for midterm and final grade submission.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1105

     

    DIY Closed Captioning & Creating Accessible Digital Content
    Thursday, 12/12, 9:00-10:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    We will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy. Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content.

    Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students. In addition, we’ll explore tools that you can use to make your documents accessible such as tagging images, using styles in Microsoft Word, etc.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1110

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Wednesday, 12/18, 10:30-12:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1111

     

    JANUARY

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Monday, 1/6, 10:30-12:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1112

     

    Design an Accessible Syllabus
    Tuesday, 1/7, 10:00-11:00
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Creating accessible documents is easy, requires little additional effort, and benefits students and instructors in various ways.  In this workshop, you’ll learn about the importance behind making an accessible syllabus and using Microsoft Word you’ll create an accessible syllabus for your class.

    Better Student Comprehension

    Well-structured documents make information easier to consume by students of all abilities. Using a well-defined heading structure allows a reader to zero in on important information quickly.

    Faster Document Revisions

    Well-structured documents allow an editor to use the Navigation Pane to quickly find sections in need of updating, like due dates or grading schedules. The styles panel also allows you to easily change the look of your document. If a document has a strong heading structure, an author can generate a table of contents programmatically.

     Less Rushing

    Students come to campus to participate in higher education with a wide range of abilities and accommodation letters are an increasingly common occurrence. A syllabus created with accessibility in mind reduces (or eliminates) the work required to accommodate all students for this document.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1113

     

    Basics of Digital Badging
    Wednesday, 1/8, 1:00-2:00
    ROWE 131
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman, CETL

    Description: In a rapidly changing society, digital badges are credentials awarded to individuals that publicly certify achievement or competence. Badges provide an indicator of accomplishment, skill, or interest in a learning environment. This session provides a basic understanding of the role of digital badging.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1140

     

    Using Portfolium to assess learning
    Thursday, 1/9/20, 10:00-11:00
    Online
    Presenter: Lauren Schlesselman

    This online session will introduce faculty to using an e-portfolio system in their courses. It will address Portfolium basics, creating and scoring assignments, and linking with HuskyCT, along with basics on program level assessment.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1135

     

    Using iClickers
    Thursday, 1/10, 10:00-11:00
    ROWE 319 and Online|
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Cloud and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Cloud and iClicker Classic versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1114

     

     

    Design an Accessible Syllabus
    Monday, 1/13, 1:00-2:00
    ROWE 319
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Creating accessible documents is easy, requires little additional effort, and benefits students and instructors in various ways.  In this workshop, you’ll learn about the importance behind making an accessible syllabus and using Microsoft Word you’ll create an accessible syllabus for your class.

    Better Student Comprehension

    Well-structured documents make information easier to consume by students of all abilities. Using a well-defined heading structure allows a reader to zero in on important information quickly.

    Faster Document Revisions

    Well-structured documents allow an editor to use the Navigation Pane to quickly find sections in need of updating, like due dates or grading schedules. The styles panel also allows you to easily change the look of your document. If a document has a strong heading structure, an author can generate a table of contents programmatically.

     Less Rushing

    Students come to campus to participate in higher education with a wide range of abilities and accommodation letters are an increasingly common occurrence. A syllabus created with accessibility in mind reduces (or eliminates) the work required to accommodate all students for this document.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1115

     

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Tuesday, 1/14, 9:00-10:30
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition, students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1116

     

     

    DIY Closed Captioning & Creating Accessible Digital Content
    Wednesday, 1/15, 11:00-12:00
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    We will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy. Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content.

    Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students. In addition, we’ll explore tools that you can use to make your documents accessible such as tagging images, using styles in Microsoft Word, etc.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1117

     

     

    Using iClickers
    Friday, 1/17, 9:30-10:30
    ROWE 319 and Online
    Presenter: Karen Skudlarek

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Cloud and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Cloud and iClicker Classic versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1118

     

    Contact edtech@uconn.edu if you have questions or would like more information.