Teaching Talks & Hands-On HuskyCT

Teaching Talks

You are invited to participate in a series of informal teaching talks.  These are opportunities for participants to comfortably share teaching concerns and discuss techniques and strategies with colleagues, experts, and CETL staff.  All sessions will take place in Rowe 319 unless otherwise noted.  All UConn instructors —graduate students, TAs, and APIRs, as well as adjunct, tenure-track and tenured faculty—are encouraged to attend.

Attend all the sessions or choose only those covering the topics that most interest you. 

Contact Suzanne LaFleur if you have questions or would like more information.

Link to HBL CLC Map – https://lib.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/FloorMap_Level2.pdf

Collaborative Learning Classroom is on the 2nd Floor of the Homer Babbidge Library. Once off the stairs or elevator take a left, take another left once through doors.

    MAY

    Wednesday, May 1                          1:45-3:00                     Reaching Under-prepared Students

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • How to recognize the underprepared students in your course
    • Steps to take, including strategies for differentiated instruction
    • What are our responsibilities and how can we meet them
    • What are the student’s responsibilities and how can we assist her/him in meeting them

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=878

     

    Tuesday, May 7                        9:30-10:45                   Syllabus design: Capturing all your ideas for next semester

    At this session, participants will discuss issues like

    • Course design concerns
    • Syllabus requirements
    • Policy statements (what to include and why)
    • How students use a syllabus
    • Using the syllabus to engage and include students

    You may bring a draft of your syllabus if you like.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=874

     

     

    Thursday, May 9                     10:00-11:15                 A conversation about strategies for inclusive teaching

    In this teaching talk we will discuss topics such as:

    • Welcoming all students and promoting belongingness
    • The relevance of diversity
    • Kinds of inclusion
    • Becoming aware of and examining our own assumptions and bias
    • The importance of dialogue and guidelines for dialogue

    Register at –https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=875

     

    Thursday, May 9                     2:00-3:15                     Exploring podcast/audio assignments in different disciplines

    Students who are reticent to speak in whole-class discussions may display remarkable eloquence and engagement through other kinds of assignments requiring oral communication. In this teaching talk we will explore how assigning students to compose podcasts or other kinds of audio-recordings can:

    • encourage creativity, participation, and listening;
    • help scaffold the development of discussion skills; and
    • increase engagement with course material.

    We think of podcasts as a series of conversations or reflections on a particular topic or theme. The genre includes a range of approaches. But generally they are informal in tone and don’t necessarily require high production values. The term “podcast” might describe a one-off audio assignment, or a series of them.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=876

     

    Friday, May 10                        11:00-12:15                 Syllabus design: Capturing all your ideas for next semester – CANCELLED 

    At this session, participants will discuss issues like

    • Course design concerns
    • Syllabus requirements
    • Policy statements (what to include and why)
    • How students use a syllabus
    • Using the syllabus to engage and include students

    You may bring a draft of your syllabus if you like.

     

     

    Wednesday, May 15               11:00-12:15                 Feedback and Assessment

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like

    • Formative and summative assessment
    • Criterion referenced (individual performance) vs. Proportionate grading (the curve)
    • Simple everyday formative assessment strategies
    • Fairness in assessment
    • Alternatives to exams, tests, and quizzes
    • The final grade

    Register at –https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=879

     

    Friday, May 17                                    1:30-2:45                     The Actor’s Tools and How They Can Enhance your Teaching

    What can actors teach us about our “role” as teacher?  We will discuss actor’s tools such as using your voice to maximum effect, body language, animation and enthusiasm, remaining fully attentive to what is happening with your “audience,” “playing to your audience,” and other acting techniques which can make your presentations more effective and engaging.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=880

     

     

    Monday, May 20                     3:15-4:30                     Making Learning Easier

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like

    • Motivating students to read and prepare for class
    • Teaching students to think and write in your particular discipline
    • Using visuals and technology effectively
    • Accommodating different learning preferences
    • Using class time to emphasize learning/study skills

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=881

     

    Thursday, May 23                   1:30-2:45                     Effective Questioning Techniques

    In this session, participants will discuss topics like:

    • What kinds of questions should we ask?
    • How can we best formulate our questions?
    • How can we promote student learning through answering questions?
    • How can we use questions to assess learning?
    • How can instructors more effectively respond to questions?

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=882

     

     

    Wednesday, May 29                     2:00-3:15                     Reflective Practice- for the Instructor and for the Students

    We will discuss ways to use reflective practice to improve your teaching. We will emphasize quick, informal, reflective techniques, as well as more formal ways to do “self-checks” related to your teaching practice.  Journals, teaching portfolios, and reflecting on student feedback will be addressed.  We will also discuss strategies to help students reflect on their learning.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=883

     

     

    Wednesday, May 29               11:00-12:15                 Classroom Climate- Accentuating the Positive

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Attentiveness
    • Active listening
    • Inclusive practice
    • Speaking kindly
    • Respecting others’ opinions
    • Accepting and giving constructive feedback

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=884

     

     

    Thursday, May30                    2:30-3:45         (ROWE 132)    Improvisation: active participation workshop with discussion

    “This will be an interactive workshop. Participants will be actively involved in doing individual, pair and small group improv activities, some silent and some vocal. As we work we will, from time to time, discuss applications to the work you do here at UConn. It is often the case that when students or clients takes on a persona, as they do during improvisational activities, they are able to more easily discuss problems and issues that are troubling them.”

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=885

     

    JUNE

    Tuesday, June 4                 1:00-2:15                     Teaching Philosophy Statements

    At this session, participants will discuss the concept of the teaching philosophy—its attributes, value, and uses—as they begin to envision writing a teaching philosophy of their own.  To prepare for this session, participants are encouraged to reflect on their own teaching by trying one of these brainstorming exercises (optional):

    • Draft a letter to someone outside academia on the joys and challenges of teaching
    • List the qualities of an effective teacher
    • Free write about a memorable experience in the classroom or in the field
    • Outline a dream course

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=892

     

    Tuesday, June 4                        2:30-3:45                     Syllabus Design

    At this session, participants will discuss issues like

    • Course design concerns
    • Syllabus requirements
    • Policy statements (what to include and why)
    • How students use a syllabus
    • Using the syllabus to engage and include students

    You may bring a draft of your syllabus if you like.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=893

     

    Wednesday, June 5                2:15-3:30                     Effective Use of Small Group Instruction in Classes of any Size

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Why small groups increase student engagement, motivation, and learning
    • The types of learning goals/objectives that are best suited to small group work
    • Important considerations for designing and implementing small group learning activities
    • Practical tips

     

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=897

     

    Thursday, June 6                    10:30-11:45                 Leading Effective Discussions

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like

    • How to maximize student participation
    • Reluctant speakers
    • Questions that lead to good instructions
    • Questions that do NOT lead to good discussions
    • Using student questions as a springboard to effective discussions

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=898

     

     

    Monday, June 10                    3:15-4:30                     Embracing Diversity in the College Classroom

    If we truly believe that our mission as educators involves providing all students with equal opportunities to learn, we have to be ready to do just that. In this session, we will address:

    • the notion of cultural competence and cultural competency in the classroom
    • how to welcome and incorporate diversity into all our classes, even if our topic/discipline doesn’t seem to obviously lend to that
    • ideas for helping ourselves and our students and be more culturally competent

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=904

     

     

    Tuesday, June 11                    1:15-2:30                     Strategies for Increasing Student Motivation

    At this session, participants will discuss topics like

    • Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation
    • The role of student choice
    • Engaging student passion
    • The importance of the teacher/student relationship
    • Challenge and reward
    • The reluctant learner
    • Service learning and other experiential techniques

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=899

     

    Wednesday, June 12               11:00-12:15                 Crafting discussion & dialogue questions

    As instructors, posing good questions can make the difference for effective class discussion and dialogue. Come share how structured conversations promote critical thinking and build community in classes large and small.  We will explore how you can design your course with discussion and dialogue opportunities in class and on HuskyCT, and what to think about when you’re crafting good questions for this purpose.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=894

     

     

    Thursday, June 13                   2:15-3:30                     Podcast and audio assignments

    Students who are reticent to speak in whole-class discussions may display remarkable eloquence and engagement through other kinds of assignments requiring oral communication. In this teaching talk we will explore how assigning students to compose podcasts or other kinds of audio-recordings can:

    • encourage creativity, participation, and listening;
    • help scaffold the development of discussion skills; and
    • increase engagement with course material.

    We think of podcasts as a series of conversations or reflections on a particular topic or theme. The genre includes a range of approaches. But generally they are informal in tone and don’t necessarily require high production values. The term “podcast” might describe a one-off audio assignment, or a series of them.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=895

     

    Monday, June 17                    2:00-3:15                     Time Management During a Single Class

    • Have a plan going in, decide roughly how much time each item will take-

    Remember that the first time you teach a class, it will require LOTS of prep time. Better plan equals more successful the class (usually) understand that nearly everything will take either more or less time than you expected it to. Adjust accordingly.

    • Do frequent time checks during class-
    • If there’s no clock in the room consult your watch or phone regularly
    • Start with your objectives
    • Plan for teaching each objective
    • Prioritize the list- what absolutely MUST be done during this class
    • Other items of lesser importance
    • Active learning (discussion, mini-projects, projects, problems…) takes time. Plan accordingly, think about presentation and assessment. Monitor students during active learning by moving around the room, checking student work. Refocus unproductive groups.
    • Start on time. End on time.
    • Have a plan for what was not covered- homework, a later class, extra credit… If it is neither covered nor assigned DO NOT TEST STUDENTS ON IT
    • At the end of class a brief wrap up or “exit slip” enhances learning.
    • Think about what you need to do after the class ends- adjust the plan for next time you teach the course, wrap up loose ends, let students know what is being done regarding material not covered- via email or HuskyCT.

    Resources:

    https://www.wgu.edu/heyteach/article/the-3-biggest-classroom-time-management-issues1809.html

    https://busyteacher.org/15547-make-classroom-time-management-work-7-simple-ways.html I don;t agree with #4 but I like the rest

    http://www.bu.edu/ctl/teaching-resources/time-management-for-faculty/

    https://blog.cengage.com/college-instructors-quick-tips-for-improving-time-management/

    https://www.packback.co/for-educators/time-management-tips-for-professors/

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=900

     

    Wednesday, June 19              2:00-3:15                     The Introvert as a Successful Teacher/Student

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Situations and learning environments where introverts thrive
    • Inclusive teaching strategies
    • Communication strategies
    • Distinguishing between introversion and lack of confidence
    • Developing a positive view of your temperament & personality

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=901

     

     

    Tuesday, June 25                    1:30-2:45                     Creating a Positive Classroom Environment

    We will discuss topics such as:

    • Maintaining a positive attitude
    • Making students feel welcome and showing you care
    • Encouraging student participation and active learning
    • Giving choices and engaging student passion
    • Celebrating both success and failure
    • Using humor to make and/or emphasize a point

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=902

     

     

    Wednesday, June 26              2:30-3:45         ROWE 132           Improvisation: active participation workshop with discussion

    This is an interactive workshop where we will “do” more than “speak,” but there will be a discussion of how doing improv exercises can help students to be more willing to speak in class, as well as other practical applications.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=903

     

     

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    HANDS-ON HUSKYCT Workshops and other EdTech Workshops

    MAY 

    LockDown Browser and Monitor:  Workshop for Instructors
    Tues., 5/7, 11:00-12:00
    ROWE 319

    This workshop will cover both basic and in-depth usage of LockDown Browser and its webcam-based add-on, Monitor. The session will include representatives from Respondus, the company that makes both products. Areas covered will include:

    – How to use LockDown Browser with Blackboard tests to prevent digital cheating in proctored testing environments
    – How to use Respondus Monitor with Blackboard tests in non-proctored environments, to protect exam integrity and confirm student identity
    – Advanced settings including combining proctored & non-proctored settings, iPad use, and using external tools in exams without compromising exam integrity
    – The student perspective of using both applications
    – Efficient review of the assessment data collected, including student videos and automated flagging
    – Best practices, resources and tips for success with both applications
    – A chance to ask questions

    To join the session, please click here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3758261983478951938

    Register at https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=860

     

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Tuesday, 5/21, 1:00-2:30
    Rowe 319 and Online

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=886

     

    DIY Closed Captioning
    Wednesday, 5/ 22, 1:00-2:00
    Rowe 319 and Online
    We will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy. Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content. Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=887

     

    Using Student Response Systems (iClicker)
    Tuesday, 5/28, 9:00-10:00
    Rowe 319 and Online

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Classic and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Classic and iClicker Cloud versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=888

     

     

    JUNE

    Create Videos for Your Class
    Wednesday, 6/5, 9:00-10:30
    Rowe 319 and Online

    Some advantages of using video in your class include the following:

    • Provides a way for students to review material
    • Provides instructors another way to present content (i.e. flip the classroom)
    • Record video “microlectures” before or after class to help with difficult concepts

    Using UConn’s video platform, Kaltura, you can record lectures, store videos, create quizzes and share them in your HuskyCT course. In addition students can use it for homework assignments or for discussions. The training will cover how faculty, staff or students can create, upload, store, edit and share videos.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=889

     

    Using Student Response Systems (iClicker)
    Monday, 6/10, 1:00-2:00
    Rowe 319 and Online

    The use of Student Response Systems or “clickers” is a proven way to engage students and let instructors know what students are thinking. We will demonstrate how to use iClicker Classic and later discuss the similarities and differences of iClicker Classic and iClicker Cloud versions of the software. The training will cover the following:

    • How to install/run the iClicker software
    • How to setup a Polling Session
    • How to run a Polling Session
    • How to link your Polling Sessions to HuskyCT
    • How to sync your roster and scores into HuskyCT
    • How to setup clicker Registration for your students in HuskyCT

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=890

     

    DIY Closed Captioning
    Thursday, 6/13, 10:00-11:00
    Rowe 319 and Online

    We will explore two applications (Kaltura and YouTube) that can be used to create closed captions for your videos. Both use computer-generated captioning which often requires that captions be edited by the video owner to improve accuracy. Research has shown that closed captions can benefit all learners as they watch the video content. Learn more about it here: https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/8/a-rising-tide-how-closed-captions-can-benefit-all-students.

    Register at – https://web9.uits.uconn.edu/fins/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=891

     

    HuskyCT: Contact Daniel Facchinetti if you have questions or would like more information.

    Other EdTech: Contact Karen Skudlarek if you have questions or would like more information.