Seminars

The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning will be offering teaching seminars and presentations on topics to enhance teaching and learning. The seminars provide an opportunity to gather with colleagues to listen, discuss, comment, interact, and reflect on a number of topics. They are organized on a first-come, first-serve basis.

If you are an individual with a disability and need accommodations, please contact Stacey Valliere at stacey.valliere@uconn.edu

The seminars are available to faculty, graduate students, and professional staff. Reservations are required and are accepted on a first-come-first serve basis. If you have signed up and are not able to attend, your colleagues would appreciate it if you unregistered, as we often have others who would like to register. Feedback from you is also important. It will help us focus as well as plan a more diverse program.

 

Fall  2020 – Online

 

Centering the body for online learning and dialogue: basic meditation techniques
Wednesday, Oct. 28, 3:00-4:30
Presenters: Rebecca Acabchuk, Tina Huey, Martina Rosenberg
Location: Online (check email or FINS on the day)

Designed as a roundtable, teaching talks are a place to explore pedagogical tools, methods, principles, and challenges. They are oriented toward anyone in a teaching or mentoring role, and as such they draw participants from faculty, staff, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students across disciplines and departments.

Simple, brief, guided meditation techniques will be introduced. Participants will consider how and at what point mindfulness and meditation techniques might be used in, or adapted for, a course or community conversation. Discussion topics may include:

  • challenging conversations
  • empathy and compassion
  • supporting online “presence”
  • community building
  • other topics of interest to participants

Co-hosted by the Initiative on Campus Dialogues

Guest presenter: Rebecca Acabchuk

Dr. Rebecca Acabchuk has a PhD in Physiology and Neurobiology. She currently works as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Connecticut, where she holds a joint appointment in the Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP) and the Department of Psychological Sciences. Her research focuses on evaluating the mental and physical health benefits of mindfulness-based programs, using advanced methods of evidence synthesis, as well as developing implementation strategies to bring evidence-based mindfulness programs into the community. She recently completed a randomized trial of 140 students at UConn comparing mindfulness tools to assist people in developing a meditation practice to self-manage stress. Rebecca runs mindfulness workshops locally and internationally, tailored for awide variety of audiences, she has been teaching meditation, yoga and other wellness classes in the private sector for over 15 years. At UConn, she has led mindfulness workshops for teachers, students, athletes, the Recovery House, First Year Programs, Student Support Services, and others. As an adjunct Professor, she has taught multiple courses at Connecticut College and UConn, including the “Neuroscience of Meditation” and “Health Psychology”. Rebecca is also an Editorial Associate for two scientific journals, Social Science & Medicine, and Psychological Bulletin.  She is a research consultant for the Mindfulness Director Initiative and the Brain Safety Alliance.

Register – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1801

 

 

Dialogue in the Classroom: Strategies for Building Engagement and Empathy.  A Two-Part Workshop

Part I, Tuesday, September 15, 1:00-3:00
Register – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1725

Part II, Wednesday, October 14, 1:00-3:00
Register – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1726

Location: Zoom; link will be provided
Presenter: Noga Shemer, Anthropology and CETL

Structured dialogues increase student engagement and foster inclusive learning environments.  By incorporating dialogic modalities into the classroom, students can learn to communicate across difference and navigate challenging conversations while engaging deeply with course content.  In this collaborative two-part workshop, participants will learn to:

  • Build the foundation for successful dialogue
  • Explore multiple ways dialogue can be used
  • Apply practical strategies in the classroom
  • Share ideas and resources

 

 

Dialogue Moderation Skills
Tuesday, November 17, 1:00-3:00
Location: Zoom; link will be provided
Presenter: Brendan Kane, History

Central to the creation of robust and respectful dialogue is the role of moderator. This workshop explores aspects of moderating both individual and series of dialogues in the classroom. Topics to be covered include the following:

  • Differences between the moderator and facilitator roles in dialogues
    • Set-up and “run-of-show” for dialogues
    • Moderating and managing dialogues on the day
    • Working with student facilitators
    • Managing student expectations
    • Balancing dialogues with learning goals and outcomes
    • Troubleshooting

Register – https://fins.uconn.edu/secure_inst/workshops/workshop_view.php?ser=1724

 

 

PAST FALL WORKSHOPS

Developing & Facilitating Engaging Online Discussions
Online
Presenters: Betsy Guala and Cathy Healy, CETL-eCampus

Online discussions are used to build dynamic learning communities, to synthesize key concepts and to promote critical thinking skills. Join us as we discuss tips for writing engaging prompts and successfully facilitating discussion forums. We will be sharing examples from a number of different disciplines.

Wednesday, September 16, 1:00 – 2:30 PM
Tuesday, September 29, 1:00 – 2:30 PM

 

Doing MORe: A Roadmap for Fostering Meaningful Online Relationships in Your Courses
Monday, September 21, 3:00-4:00
Online
Presenters:  Amanda Denes and Rory McGloin

Amanda Denes and Rory McGloin (Associate Professors in the Department of Communication) are offering a short presentation followed by a group discussion to share their experiences and activities for helping students build peer-to-peer relationships in online contexts. As online courses increase, students may miss opportunities for informal interaction and friendship formation with their fellow classmates. Building upon tasks focused on relationship formation online, this session invites faculty to drop in to discuss opportunities for promoting student-to-student engagement online, including possible opportunities for research collaboration. Feel free to stop by for as short or long as you are able!

 

 

Distance Learning Assessment Strategies
Wednesday, September 23, 10:00 – 11:00 am
Online: WebEx link will be coming soon
Presenter: Dave Giblin

Dave Giblin is an APIR in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Avery Point, where he has connected engineering students across regional campuses with his distance-learning courses. Dr. Giblin joined UConn in 2013, and has taught 14 distance-learning courses over the past 5 years (including two this semester). He is a firm believer in problem-based learning for long-term retention in STEM education, and incorporates teamwork and active learning in his synchronous distance-learning classes.

In this one-hour interactive session, we will identify and evaluate assessment types commonly used in HuskyCT. Dave will share detailed examples of two forms of assessment he has used in the past: 1) Short asynchronous calculated-numeric quizzes, and 2) Synchronous open-book exams. We will discuss tips and tricks in DL assessment strategies with a strong focus on assessments for STEM courses.  Join us whether you are just learning or have numerous experiences to share regarding assessment in HuskyCT.  There will be time for break-out group discussion.

 

 

 In-person sessions at Keney Park in Hartford (socially distanced)

Join Julia Yakovich from the Office of Service Learning at CETL, in-person at the idyllic Keney Park Sustainability Project to discuss strategies that will engage students in efficient, appropriate service learning projects this fall. Join colleagues to brainstorm ideas and approaches for lesson planning, syllabus development, curriculum design, and flexible approaches to offering content and aligning to a relevant community based project. This will be a casual conversation based on topics and questions brought to the session. The new food project for Hartford will be a topic at hand. Please see here for initial information https://hartfordfooddistribution.wordpress.com/.

Dates:

Thursday, August 27
Thursday, September 3
Thursday, September 24
Time: 1:00 pm-2:00 pm

Location: following your registration, the physical address and other social distancing information will be forwarded

 

Developing Active-Learning Activities for your Course
Online
Presenter:  Andy Jolly-Ballantine, Geography

By now you have a set of module-scale objectives for your class and some content ready to present. You have heard that it is good to inject some active learning into the module to engage students and provide variety to your assessments of their learning. For many of us, the step of creating activities and engaging assessments for every objective in a class can seem like an overwhelming task. Let’s take it one step at a time by targeting one objective you want to address with active learning and discuss how we can do this with your peers. This open session is intended as a forum for instructors (teaching in any modality) with some knowledge of working with objectives and assessments. We will talk with one another about building effective, active learning tools for engaging students and assessing their understanding of the material in a low-risk manner. We will keep the number of participants small so we can each have a chance to discuss a thorny problem we are grappling with and hear about how others are building their own activities. This workshop will be repeated so feel free to come back to continue sharing ideas and building your library of active learning tools.

Tuesday, August 25, 1:00-2:30

Tuesday, September 1, 1:00-2:30

Tuesday, September 22, 1:00-2:30

 

 

Developing & Facilitating Engaging Online Discussions – Webinar
Online – WebEx link will be emailed to registered participants
Presenters: Zack Goldberg and David Des Armier, CETL-eCampus

Online discussions are used to build dynamic learning communities, to synthesize key concepts and to promote critical thinking skills. Join us as we discuss tips for writing engaging prompts and successfully facilitating discussion forums. We will be sharing examples from a number of different disciplines.

Tuesday, August 18, 1:00pm – 2:30pm

Monday, August 24, 11:00am – 12:30pm

 

 

After-lunch virtual coffee hour conversations with CETL Service Learning

Join Julia Yakovich from the Office of Service Learning at CETL to talk about strategies to engage students in efficient, appropriate service learning projects this fall (it’s not to late!) and spring 2021 (it’s never too early). Join colleagues to brainstorm ideas and approaches for lesson planning, syllabus development, curriculum design, and flexible approaches to offering content and aligning to a relevant community based project. This will be a casual conversation based on topics and questions brought to the session.

Dates:
Tuesday, August 25
Tuesday, September 1
Tuesday, September 8
Time: 1:00 pm-2:00 pm

Location: following your registration, a WebEx link will be forwarded to you

 

 

Principles of Universal Design to Support Learners with Disabilities
Tuesday, September 8, 1:00-2:30
Online
Presenters:  Emily Tarconish and Andy Jolly-Ballantine

Did you know that at least 19% of college students at postsecondary institutions in the United States register for disability services and accommodations? This number likely underestimates the actual population as many students with disabilities do not self-disclose nor seek academic accommodations. There are ways to adjust your class environment to make learning more accessible for all students, including those with disabilities. Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) is a set of simple principles for making classrooms accessible to all students. In this session we will present the principles of UDI and some easy-to-adopt techniques that you can use to make your class (whether live or online) accessible, and probably more engaging, to the greatest number of learners, including those with disabilities.

After this session you will be able to:

  • Better characterize of the population of students with disabilities
  • Consider how inclusive teaching methods may make learning more accessible to students with different types of disabilities
  • Relate the principles of Universal Design for Instruction to your class
  • Assess your course to identify ways in which aspects might not meet the needs of all students
  • (Re)Develop your course to accommodate the learning needs of all students
  • Identify resources that can further help you with supporting students with disabilities

Adjusting your class to the principles of UDI does not have to be a monumental task, but even small changes, such as free, automatic closed-captioning, can make a huge difference for many students, including those with disabilities or who are English language learners. This will be an interactive session and we will provide hands-on activities to help you identify ways in which you can adjust your course and syllabus. UDI is a framework that can be used to make your classroom more inclusive not only for students with disabilities, but students of all backgrounds.