Mid-Semester Formative Feedback

To better understand how students are assessing your class and to gain feedback about how to improve for the rest of the semester, we suggest that faculty consider gathering formative assessment feedback. The goal of formative assessment is to monitor student learning and provide you with ongoing feedback that you can use to improve your teaching. Formative assessment can help you to recognize when your students are struggling and enable you to address problems in the middle of the semester.

Many instructors choose to create and administer their own surveys, student self-assessments, or feedback forms.  These questionnaires can be completed in class, through HuskyCT or online via Qualtrics.

It is often best to ask specific, actionable questions in areas where you can make changes in the remaining weeks of the semester. Some possible areas of focus are learning environment, classroom activities, pace of course, clarity/communication, assignments, and course materials. It can also be useful to ask students to self-assess their preparation, participation, and skill development in the class. Avoid general satisfaction questions.

Formative assessments can be used confidentially or you can decide to share the results and your corresponding changes with your department head or teaching mentor and include them in your teaching portfolio. It can be helpful to reflect on the ways you use student feedback to improve student learning in your classes.

CETL consultants are available to help you design your mid-semester survey and administer it during class. For those instructors who would like to be observed and given feedback, consultations can be arranged for a one-time observation or for ongoing work with feedback and successive observations. Contact cetl@uconn.edu

Mid-Semester Course Feedback. pdf is a sample survey that some instructors use as a building block.   It can also be delivered to your students through Qualtrics. Simply request Mid-Semester Course Feedback on the form below.

We have also identified some formative assessments that you can download and use. Our colleagues at the Institutional Effectiveness Office at Western Carolina State University developed these instruments and have given us permission to use them. We particularly liked the different types of course assessments and suggest you use one that is appropriate for formative assessment in your class.

Administering Mid-Semester Evaluations

Paper Based Evaluations: Please review the course definitions below, select the appropriate form for your course, and print out the forms to administer the evaluation in your class.

Online Evaluations in Qualtrics administered by OIRE:  Use the following link to request online evaluations:

Mid-Semester Formative Feedback – Online Forms Using Qualtrics

For assistance, please contact Suzanne.LaFleur@uconn.edu

Course Definitions ~ Click on Course Heading to View and Print Forms

Online Course.pdf
In an online course, all required contact hours are internet-based. Contact includes instruction, learning activities, and interactions (both student-student and/or student-instructor). Completion of assessments and exams in-person at authorized proctoring locations may be required at the instructor’s discretion (this includes semester and final assessments and exams).

Blended/Hybrid Course.pdf
In a blended/hybrid course, online contact displaces some portion of the required contact hours that would normally take place in a scheduled face-to-face course. Contact includes instruction, learning activities, and interactions (both student-student and/or student-instructor).

In-Person.pdf
In an in-person course, all required contact hours occur during regularly scheduled face-to-face class meeting times. Contact includes instruction, learning activities, and interactions (both student-student and/or student-instructor). An in-person course is considered web-enhanced when online course elements are provided to students but do not displace any of the required contact hours that would normally occur in a scheduled in-person class.

Seminar Course.pdf
Seminar courses are typically small classes, emphasizing discussion, presentations by students, and written assignments. In a seminar course, all required contact hours occur during regularly scheduled face-to-face class meeting times.

iTV Course.pdf
In an iTV course a student can be located at Storrs or at any of the five regional campuses.  The video conferencing system allows for multiple 2 way connections regionally, nationally, and internationally.  The iTV rooms are comprised of technology that allows instructors to send both their image (from the camera) and any computer generated course content to multiple locations at once.  In addition, the instructor can view remote classrooms.

Laboratory Course.pdf
Laboratory courses are generally hands-on, workshop component of a class usually held in a laboratory. The laboratory time is separate from the lecture although it is often associated to a lecture(s).

Internship, Practica, and Clinical Course.pdf
Internship, practica and clinical courses are generally Structured practical experience in a professional program, supervised by a practitioner and/or faculty member with whom the student works closely. These classes are often held off campus at a professional location.

Independent Study or Research Course.pdf
Independent Study or research courses generally provides an individual student with an opportunity for original study or investigatiLecture/Lab (Project) Courselization on a more autonomous basis.

Lecture/Lab (Project) Course.pdf
Lecture lab (project) courses are generally classes that have some lecture and some hands-on components but do not require a separate time like a traditional lab.

Lecture/Lab (Traditional) Course.pdf
Lecture lab (traditional) courses are generally hands-on, workshop component of a class usually held in a laboratory. The laboratory time is separate from the lecture although it is often associated to a lecture.

Studio/Performance Course.pdf
Studio/Performance courses are generally those with a hands-on workshop component of design/dance/music in the arts courses.

Activities Course.pdf
Activities courses are generally held under the supervision of a faculty member or group of faculty in which the student conducts research or participates in activities that are expected to lead to a specific project such as dissertation, thesis, report, or publication.

 

Mid-Semester Course Feedback. Pdf

This survey is useful for most classes regardless of format and uses open-ended questions that focus on student learning.

 

Please contact seteaching@uconn.edu with questions regarding data collection or analyses.